Autumn Newsletter

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Newsletter

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Five Self Care Tips for Autumn

 

Autumn is a favorite season for many people. The weather starts getting a little cooler, things are beginning to slow down and preparations for Christmas begins. For many others, autumn is not so festive. Many people get sick during the autumn months, allergies can flare up for some, and many don’t like the steady decrease in hours of sunlight, sometimes leading to seasonal depression. Here are some tips on how to get through the season without incident.

 

  1. Wear a scarf.

 

The large intestine channel runs up the arms, across the shoulders, up the neck, over the face and ends next to the nose. As many people now know, the health of our gastrointestinal tract plays a big part in our immunity, so keeping the large intestine channel warm and preventing exposure from the elements will help keep you healthy. Cold pathogens can enter the body through the pores or nasal cavity, but wrapping the neck and shoulders with a scarf can help ward them off. Scarves don’t have to be thick or heavy, but they should cover the neck.

 

  1. Eat according to the season

 

Eating foods readily available during the autumn months and foods that boost the energy of the lung and large intestine meridians is a great way to keep the organs associated with autumn – the lung and large intestine – in balance. In the autumn, you should eat fewer cold and raw foods like salads and instead eat more warm and cooked foods. Foods to enjoy during the autumn months include apples, squash, broccoli, sweet potatoes, pears, bananas, cabbage, carrots, cranberries, ginger, pumpkin, cinnamon, nutmeg and wild rice. Hot herbal teas are another good addition to your daily diet, especially those containing ginger and lemon, which act as natural antibiotics.

 

  1. Stay hydrated

 

The large intestine and the lungs need to stay moist to function properly, so drinking lots of water is important during the autumn. Without proper hydration, the skin, which is controlled by the lung meridian, can become dry and cracked, allowing pathogens to easily enter the body. The large intestine meridian also needs proper hydration in order to expel any pathogens that do get into the system.

 

  1. Let it go (literally and metaphorically)

 

Autumn is the season of letting go. Just as the trees let go of brightly colored leaves, you too should let go of whatever is bogging you down. This can include physical items like clothing, as well as items that are clogging up your mental wardrobe, like unresolved emotions. Letting go of attachments can make way for growth and regeneration to occur in the spring.

 

  1. Get acupuncture!

 

As the autumn months approach, it is a good idea to increase your regular acupuncture treatments. There are many acupuncture points that help boost immunity, fight off colds, help with releasing emotions and improve digestion. Why not utilize the natural power we have to offer? By doing so, you might just survive the autumn without ever getting sick and be better prepared for the upcoming months and seasons that follow.

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Healthy Foods for Autumn

 

 

The season of autumn brings cooler weather and shorter days. As with any season, the world adjusts accordingly. Plants begin to go dormant, animals begin scrounging for food to store to get them through the upcoming winter months and humans start winterizing everything.

 

As autumn descends on the land, it reminds us we need to start cutting back on the numerous cooling foods that are consumed during the summer months. Things like raw foods, salads, juices and fruits should be decreased because they can create too much cold in the body, according to traditional Chinese medicine.

 

There are many facets to traditional Chinese medicine and nutrition is one of the most important. The ancient Chinese observed what took place in nature and followed those cues accordingly. So when the season changed to autumn and the amount of daylight decreased and the temperatures cooled, the Chinese began to eat what was available. This is what it means to “eat for the season.” By eating according to the season, we can avoid many illnesses and diseases. If we continue to eat raw, cold foods during the cooler autumn and winter months, then we set ourselves up for digestive problems, colds, sinus infections and even painful joints. When a person eats seasonally, they will inevitably notice that certain foods are no longer abundant or available. During autumn, one should fill his or her cupboards with dried foods, heavy grains, seeds, roots and squashes. In TCM, these foods help move the body’s energy or qi (pronounced “chee”) inward.

 

Autumn is also a time to slow down. This means that we should cook food for longer periods of time on lower heat. How we cook food will affect how the body tolerates it and how the energy is used. For autumn, TCM suggests making soups and stews, using a slow cooker, roasting and baking foods. These methods create a deeper warmth and supply greater energy from the food.

 

Foods that are nourishing to the lungs are very important during autumn. Since many people get sick during these months, lung tonifying foods can be very beneficial. This includes foods like ginger, onion, garlic, pears, walnuts, miso, navy beans, almonds, asparagus, broccoli, apricots, bananas, apples, plums and grapes.

 

The drier weather can also cause chapped lips, a dry nose, an itchy throat, rough skin and even dry stools. To counter these issues, it is recommended to eat foods that promote the production of bodily fluids, such as nuts, seeds, pears, pumpkins and honey.

 

When we follow the cues given to us by nature, we can maintain a very healthy existence.

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The Yin and Yang of Back Pain

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